through the screen doors of discretion

Posts tagged with 'maine'.
saucymag:

Fiddleheads in Maine. 
The very best part of foraging is learning how to look closely. You cannot see something, and then you can. The rewards of attention are so high that to walk carelessly seems foolish.
I go out in the mornings and look at the fiddleheads in the back yard, stepping around the little ones stretching out of their brown protective paper. Unpeeling them in the kitchen reveals the young ferns that taste as green as they look. 
A few weeks ago, I pan-fried a soft shell crab and plated it over crispy fiddleheads in a butter-wine pan sauce, happy to bring both of these fleeting harbingers of spring together, for a moment. 
ZoomInfo
saucymag:

Fiddleheads in Maine. 
The very best part of foraging is learning how to look closely. You cannot see something, and then you can. The rewards of attention are so high that to walk carelessly seems foolish.
I go out in the mornings and look at the fiddleheads in the back yard, stepping around the little ones stretching out of their brown protective paper. Unpeeling them in the kitchen reveals the young ferns that taste as green as they look. 
A few weeks ago, I pan-fried a soft shell crab and plated it over crispy fiddleheads in a butter-wine pan sauce, happy to bring both of these fleeting harbingers of spring together, for a moment. 
ZoomInfo

saucymag:

Fiddleheads in Maine. 

The very best part of foraging is learning how to look closely. You cannot see something, and then you can. The rewards of attention are so high that to walk carelessly seems foolish.

I go out in the mornings and look at the fiddleheads in the back yard, stepping around the little ones stretching out of their brown protective paper. Unpeeling them in the kitchen reveals the young ferns that taste as green as they look. 

A few weeks ago, I pan-fried a soft shell crab and plated it over crispy fiddleheads in a butter-wine pan sauce, happy to bring both of these fleeting harbingers of spring together, for a moment. 

theatlantic:

Does City Life Have to Mean Life Without Stars?

I remember the first time I went camping. I was 12 years old, and my swim team went on a rafting trip to the Delaware Water Gap. We got into camp in the dead of night, and I was blown away by the brightness of bodies in the night sky. I’d grown up well inside the nimbus of artificial light surrounding New York; what I remember most vividly is the feeling of disorientation as I stared up at the jam-packed firmament, streaked by the fluid, wispy smoke of the Milky Way, all of it animated from time to time by the fiery trail of a meteor. That looks so fake. Are those really all stars? How could there be so many up there, and how could I not have known about them until now? The unpolluted night sky, to me, was a revelation.

Filmmaker Ian Cheney had the opposite experience. Growing up in rural Maine, he saw the unfiltered night sky as a friend, a familiar, map-like indicator of home. It was only after he’d moved to New York as an adult that he started thinking about his connection to the night sky, and what happens when we as a species lose the reality of night - indeed, of darkness - in our daily lives. In a new documentary that’s making its way across the country, The City DarkCheney takes a thought-provoking and lively look at the disappearance of darkness across our planet and the disruption of our natural cycles of light and dark. […]

And it’s more than just humans who are losing the night. Nature is, too. Footage of just-hatched sea turtles trying to find their way to the ocean in Florida is one of the more heartbreaking scenes in the movie, when the disoriented hatchlings head toward the bright light of nearby apartment complexes instead of toward the moonlit water.

Light changes habitat just like a bulldozer can. In the film, Cheney says that he sleeps better up in Maine, positing that in New York he misses not just the stars in the night sky, but the dark that comes with it. From talking with leading epidemiologists and cellular biologists, he finds that the health effects of 24/7 light can be severe; studies have found almost double the incidence of breast cancer in night shift workers, and evidence points to disrupted circadian rhythms from exposure to light at night. He discovers that the World Health Organization has identified night shift work as a probable carcinogen.

Read more at The Atlantic Cities. [Image: Wicked Delicate Films]

Now is a good time to mention I’m in Maine for a bit. 

      Ladle: Food Sovereignty law passed in Sedgwick, Maine

Maybe the citizens of tiny Sedgwick on the Maine coast were listening to the calls of Dave Milano, Ken Conrad, and others for more trust and community, and less rigid one-size-fits-all food regulation.

On Friday evening, they became perhaps the first locale in the country to pass a “Food Sovereignty” law. It’s the proposed ordinance I first described last fall, when I introduced the “Five Musketeers”, a group of farmers and consumers intent on pushing back against overly aggressive agriculture regulators. The regulators were interfering with farmers who, for example, took chickens to a neighbor for slaughtering, or who sold raw milk directly to consumers.

The proposed ordinance was one of 78 being considered at the Sedgwick town meeting, that New England institution that has stood the test of time, allowing all of a town’s citizens to vote yea or nay on proposals to spend their tax money and, in this case, enact potentially far-reaching laws with national implications. They’ve been holding these meetings in the Sedgwick town hall (pictured above) since 1794. At Friday’s meeting, about 120 citizens raised their hands in unanimous approval of the ordinance.

Citing America’s Declaration of Independence and the Maine Constitution, the ordinance proposed that “Sedgwick citizens possess the right to produce, process, sell, purchase, and consume local foods of their choosing.” These would include raw milk and other dairy products and locally slaughtered meats, among other items.

This isn’t just a declaration of preference. The proposed warrant added, “It shall be unlawful for any law or regulation adopted by the state or federal government to interfere with the rights recognized by this Ordinance.” In other words, no state licensing requirements prohibiting certain farms from selling dairy products or producing their own chickens for sale to other citizens in the town.

- from Health Impact News, January 5, 2012. Link.

Food sovereignty has a nice ring to it.

emilyqualey:

Return of the Sledi

Apparently this is what we are all missing at the National Toboggan Championships in Camden, Maine.

Emily, I trust you are celebrating for all of us.